Photos: A Walk in the Gardens

I forgot to write about this last month, when I actually did it, but better late than never.

In August, I went to Dawes Arboretum, a nearby collection of plants, gardens, and other types of horticulture, to explore the grounds. Armed with my camera, I explored the All-Seasons Garden, a walled garden, and the Japanese Garden. I had first been to Dawes for the wedding of an old friend last September, but I’d never been to explore, and wanted to go back. This Saturday in August provided the perfect chance to do it.

Walled garden

 

The Japanese Garden

 

Entrance to the Japanese Garden

 

Ohio countryside

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30 Important Books: No. 10, Catechism of the Catholic Church

This, along with the Bible, is certainly a very important book for any Catholic.

There’s a lot to Catholicism. 2000 years of history will do that. So the CCC (as it’s commonly abbreviated) is a sort of “idiot’s guide” to what we believe, and why. It’s indispensable. Every possible topic you can think of is covered here, in detail, but not in so much detail that you can’t clearly understand what’s being said. And if you want to investigate where the authors got these ideas, there are many, many footnotes which lead you to other documents. (It could become a sort of scavenger hunt through books, if you will)

My copy is trade paperback size. When the CCC first came out in the 1990s, it was actually–not kidding–on sale at the supermarket, and this was before you could buy more than a few books at the supermarket. My parents have the big, coffee-colored covered one, and we’ve marked it with various and sundry post-its and scraps of paper over the years, to indicate things we often referred to. My own is broken in a few places, thanks to some theology courses I took which relied heavily on the CCC, and is also very well marked.

One of the beauties of the CCC is how everything is clearly reasoned, cited, and organized.If you’re Catholic and you don’t have this, go get it. (It’s like $6!) With it, there is never the “oh, I don’t know what my Church believes.” Now you know.