Saints Are Not Sad

I believe it was Venerable Fulton Sheen who said, “saints are not sad.” His assertion is borne out by other saints, namely Saint Padre Pio, who said, “Pray, hope, and don’t worry.”

‘Tis the season to be thankful. But I’ve noticed a lot of grumpy Catholics lately. Or, more accurately, doomsday Catholics, who feel that we’re all going to perish anon if we don’t give up all pleasures and move to a monastery to weep for our sins….Read the rest over at Suscipio!


Prosper the work of our hands

Recently, I took up knitting. I’ve been wanting to do this for many years, now, but somehow I never quite got the gist of it–how to cast on, how to actually knit. I liked to look at the pretty patterns and vibrant yarn shades in craft stores, but the actual art of sewing remained a mystery to me.

Last month, a friend of mine sat down with me and taught me to knit. One of the things she taught me is that knitting isn’t an art where you see immediate results. It takes time for the rows and shape of the item to come into being; in fact, for the first three or four rows of any project, it can look like large bit of knotted wool! I kept thinking I was doing it wrong. But by the time I reached 10, 20, or 30 rows, I could see that I was actually making something. There was form and beauty there, and probably a few mistakes. But for the most part, it was a recognizable object. The yarn had been turned, by my hands and the needles, into a piece of fabric that had uses.

Read the rest at Suscipio. 

Preaching the Kingdom

This is one of those mysteries that you can ponder for a long time and never quite finish pondering it. The “preaching of the kingdom” covers just about everything in the gospels: the Sermon on the Mount, the parables, the cures, the Loaves and Fishes, the Bread of Life discourse–all of Jesus’ preaching and activities. In that sense, it’s an easy mystery to pray, because you can pick your favorite image or story or event and meditate on that.

But I think it’s also fruitful to use this to ponder our own sense of mission. For nuns and sisters, it’s their prayer and their apostolate that is their preaching. For married women, it’s their married life, and growing in holiness with their husbands; for a mother, it’s taking care of her family, and raising her kids to know God and to be devout Catholics. For the single, it can be a little harder, but we are all called to holiness, to prayer, and to bringing that to the world.


For the rest, head over to Suscipio.